National Public Radio (NPR)


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Organization website

Primary geographic focus: NATIONAL
Organization type(s): Media
Acronym or short name: NPR


CONTENT FROM THIS SOURCE

Interview

Trump Administration’s Suspension Of Legal Aid For Migrant Children Prompts Outcry LISTEN· 4:04

Mary Louise Kelly
National Public Radio (NPR)
June 7, 2019
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Michelle Ortiz, deputy director of Americans for Immigrant Justice, about the Trump administration's plan to suspend legal aid for unaccompanied migrant children.

Interview

White House Cuts Activities Funding For Unaccompanied Migrant Children

National Public Radio (NPR)
June 6, 2019
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Wendy Young, president of Kids in Need of Defense, about the discontinuation of funds for English classes and legal aid for unaccompanied child migrants in U.S. shelters.

Audio

‘Someone To Speak For You’: Low-Income Tenants Get Lawyers For Housing Court

Jenifer McKim
National Public Radio (NPR)
April 3, 2019
The right to counsel program, signed into law in 2017, is meant to address the legal disparity in a city where historically only one in 10 tenants in housing court had a lawyer, while most landlords had legal representation.

News Story

Defining What’s Excessive In Police Property Seizures Remains Tricky

Martin Kaste
National Public Radio (NPR)
April 9, 2019
Tyson Timbs won his Supreme Court case in February, but he still doesn't have his Land Rover.

Audio , Interview

Millions Raised For Immigrants Will Be Used To Provide Legal Support

Mary Louise Kelly
National Public Radio (NPR)
June 21, 2018
Mary Louise Kelly talks with Jenny Hixon, outreach director for the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, about the millions of dollars raised to help immigrants at detention centers and how the organization is using the funds.

Audio , News Story

A Salvadoran Woman Missed Her U.S. Court Date. What Happens Next?

Lulu Garcia-Navarro
National Public Radio (NPR)
April 9, 2018
Many of these migrants are women and children, fleeing violence in their home countries, like one El Salvadoran woman and her son who NPR has been following for more than a year.

News Story

Home Care Agencies Often Wrongly Deny Medicare Help To The Chronically Ill

Susan Jaffe
National Public Radio (NPR)
January 17, 2018
Because of his disability, he has Medicare coverage, but he can't use it for home care — as the former computer systems manager has been told by 14 home health care providers.

News Story

As Temperatures Fall, No Halt To Evictions Across Most Of The Country

Pam Fessler
National Public Radio (NPR)
December 18, 2017
In Wisconsin, the state legislature passed a law in 2011 that expressly prohibits local governments from imposing eviction moratoriums.

News Story

Worry And Confusion As Puerto Ricans Scramble To Apply For FEMA Aid

Malaka Gharib
National Public Radio (NPR)
October 28, 2017
These are the kinds of legal issues that pop up over and over again and can complicate filling out FEMA's form. Answer one question incorrectly and an applicant's chances of getting the full aid amount could be jeopardized.

News Story

How A Traffic Fine Can Lead To Jail Time In California

Leah Donnella
National Public Radio (NPR)
May 4, 2017
According to a new report from the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area, traffic fines in California have an outsize effect on low-income drivers and people of color.

Audio , News Story

As Obamacare Repeal Heats Up, Newly Insured North Carolinians Fret

Michael Tomsic
National Public Radio (NPR)
January 9, 2017
Hawes is one of about 550,000 North Carolinians who relies on the Obamacare marketplace for health insurance. She was relieved after she talked with an enrollment specialist last month who told her she can renew her policy for 2017.

News Story

Washington State Dairy Workers Challenge Their Exemption From Overtime Pay

Elizabeth Grossman
National Public Radio (NPR)
December 9, 2016
Aguilar and Martinez are challenging this labor law exemption in Washington by filing a class-action lawsuiton behalf of all agricultural workers in the state.

Audio , News Story

Advocates In Baltimore Help Expunge Arrests That Didn’t Lead To Charges

Mary Rose Madden
National Public Radio (NPR)
November 21, 2016
For years, thousands of people were arrested in Baltimore on charges that were dismissed when brought to court. But their records remained tainted with the arrests.

Audio , Interview

Louisiana Residents Request Free Legal Aid In Flood Recovery Efforts

Ari Shapiro
National Public Radio (NPR)
November 2, 2016
In the two months since historic floods hit the greater Baton Rouge, La., area, recovery has begun. There has also been an increase in requests for free legal aid.

Audio , News Story

In South Texas, Fair Wages Elude Farmworkers, 50 Years After Historic Strike

John Burnett
National Public Radio (NPR)
August 11, 2016
Still, working conditions have improved in the decades since the failed strike.

Audio , News Story

Halt On Juvenile Immigrant Visa Leaves Thousands In Limbo

Richard Gonzales, Marisa Peñaloza
National Public Radio (NPR)
July 28, 2016
Applying for asylum isn't easy. As a result, some young immigrants are choosing another way of staying in this country legally: a visa category called "Special Immigrant Juvenile Status."

News Story

Nonprofit Hospital Stops Suing So Many Poor Patients: Will Others Follow?

Paul Kiel, Chris Arnold
ProPublica, National Public Radio (NPR)
June 1, 2016
A story by ProPublica and NPR and a Senate investigation prompt a Missouri nonprofit hospital to change its policies and forgive thousands of patients’ debts. But without similar scrutiny, it’s unclear if other hospitals that sue the poor will change.

Audio , Feature

In A High-Rent World, Affordable And Safe Housing Is Hard To Come By

Pam Fessler
National Public Radio (NPR)
March 30, 2016
Most tenants who fail to pay rent and are taken to court have no legal representation while most landlords do.

News Story

Welcome To Rent Court, Where Tenants Can Face A Tenuous Fate

Pam Fessler
National Public Radio (NPR)
March 28, 2016
Today, more than 11 million families spend over half of their incomes on rent, and for the poor, it can be as much as 80 percent.

Audio , News Story

After Overpayment Of Benefits, VA Wanted $38,000 Back

Patricia Murphy
KUOW (local NPR, Seattle), National Public Radio (NPR)
January 27, 2016
The Department of Veterans Affairs says it overpaid 2,200 incarcerated vets more than $24 million but puts the burden on veterans when the fault of overpayment is their own.

Audio , Interview

U.S. Raids Target Undocumented Immigrants

National Public Radio (NPR)
January 5, 2016
Federal immigration officials are targeting some Central American families for deportation. David Greene talks to Jonathan Ryan of RAICES, a Texas group that provides legal services to immigrants.

Audio , Investigative

Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

Daniel Zwerdling
National Public Radio (NPR)
October 28, 2015
A NPR investigation suggests the Army failed to pursue key evidence in its investigation, ruling out claims of mistreatment from nine other war veterans without ever interviewing or even contacting the men.

Audio , News Story

After Katrina, New Orleans’ Public Housing Is A Mix Of Pastel And Promises

Pam Fessler
National Public Radio (NPR)
August 17, 2015
At the time of Katrina, more than 5,000 families lived in public housing; today, there are only 1,900.

Audio , News Story

U.S. Immigration Agency Again Drops ‘Family Friendly’ Detention Centers

John Burnett
National Public Radio (NPR)
July 16, 2015
After facing a lot of criticism, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency is changing the way it handles mothers and children who come to the U.S. illegally.

News Story

With A Series Of Small Bans, Cities Turn Homelessness Into A Crime

Pam Fessler
National Public Radio (NPR)
July 16, 2014
Laws that criminalize homelessness are on the rise across the country. And it's only making the problem worse.

Audio , News Story

Lack Of Affordable Housing Puts The Squeeze On Poor Families

Pam Fessler
National Public Radio (NPR)
May 27, 2014
NPR report on housing crunch in Washington, DC as gentrification presses the poor living in affordable housing. Some receive help from the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless.



This page last modified: Thu, April 16, 2015 -- 8:56 am ET