Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)


Based in Boston, NPQ is an independent nonprofit with an online presence.
Website

Primary geographic focus: NATIONAL
Organization type(s): Media
Acronym or short name: NPQ

NPQ was launched as a national print journal in the winter of 1999 and was designed to fill a gap by providing credible, research based articles for nonprofits about management and governance. Soon after it began it also started to cover issues related to the operating environment for nonprofits, specifically public policy and philanthropy. NPQ’s quarterly print journal soon became known as The Harvard Business Review for the nonprofit sector.

In April 2006 NPQ spun off from its original parent and became an independent nonprofit.

In 2008, NPQ added an active online publishing component virtually overnight stemming from a realization that its readers needed a constant stream of well analyzed and contextualized information to stay abreast of an environment full of both unprecedented opportunity and unforeseeable peril, and so it started a daily send out of news and features. This material is designed to help nonprofit practitioners negotiate their rapidly changing landscape. NPQ’s budget did not expand as a result of the shift but instead it eventually began to call upon its readers to act as regular correspondents. This required a complete redesign of our revenue and publishing models.

This engagement of our readership in NPQ’s collaborative journalism model has expanded NPQ’s intelligence and its capacity to gather and analyze the news in real time and from a variety of perspectives. It is highly innovative, however, and one of many experimental models in the field of digital publishing.

NPQ partners actively with many other groups to make sure that its readership community is continuously expanding and that it reflects the mix of organizational sizes and types in the civil sector.

NPQ is a nonprofit based in Boston. It has six staff members and a board of directors but what really fuels it and provides it its credibility are its community of volunteer content contributors/readers and cash contributors.

NPQ has always been known for its rigor and grounded understanding of nonprofits and philanthropy and it has always depended upon its readership to guide its editorial agenda. This is what keeps it relevant and a trusted source for hundreds of thousands of practitioners across the country and beyond.

NPQ’s guiding philosophy is that an active and engaged and sometimes disruptive civil sector is critical to a healthy democracy in the same way that a free and independent press is – NPQ is striving to be the authoritative independent news source for civil society and we will only get there with your involvement.



CONTENT FROM THIS SOURCE

Column

Eviction Representation: A Critical Component of Housing Justice

Spencer Wells
Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)
November 26, 2018
The costs and benefits of eviction representation are the focus of a new study of universal representation in Philadelphia.

Column

Cleveland Group Helps Tenants Fight Lead Poisoning in Housing Court

Spencer Wells
Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)
January 2, 2018
As a practical matter, when a tenant ends up in housing court, the summons dissipates the family’s fear of retaliation. The choice is resist or become homeless.

Blog Post

Tough Times for Legal Aid Everywhere, But Especially in Hawaii

Nancy Young
Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)
July 10, 2017
The cut comes at a time when legal aid groups in Hawaii and throughout the nation are already facing more demand for their services than they can meet.

Blog Post , Editorial

Where’s LSC’s Funding? 150 Big Law Firms and 134 Nonprofits Want to Know

Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)
March 10, 2017
LSC began to sound the alarm among its partners, which include many high-powered law firms that provide pro bono services in conjunction with them. They were already organized to respond.

Blog Post

Baltimore Eviction Rate among Highest in Country: A Study of Rent Court

Spencer Wells
Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)
December 10, 2015
The injustice and social cost of eviction is slowly making its way to the attention of mass media as activist groups around the country focus attention on archaic legal systems through which property owners control rental housing.

News Story

Underfunded Legal Aid in MA Leaves 2/3 of Those in Need Unrepresented

Ruth McCambridge
Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ)
October 20, 2014
According to a new study, 64 percent of the low income people in Massachusetts who applied for and were qualified for civil legal assistance were turned away in 2014.



This page last modified: Thu, April 16, 2015 -- 6:55 pm ET