Ethan Bronner

Journalist (NATIONAL)
Deputy national editor for New York Times. Was most recently national legal affairs correspondent for The Times. Previously covered Supreme Court for the Boston Globe.
Tags: Courts

Links: NYT posts | Twitter | (Current as of: December 3, 2014)

Ethan Bronner, deputy national editor, was most recently national legal affairs correspondent for The Times. Before, he was Jerusalem bureau chief, following four years as the newspaper’s deputy foreign editor. Mr. Bronner has also served as assistant editorial page editor of The Times, education editor and national education correspondent. Right after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, he worked in the paper’s investigative unit focusing on Al Qaeda.

A graduate of the College of Letters at Wesleyan University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Mr. Bronner began his journalism career at Reuters in 1980, reporting from London, Madrid, Brussels and Jerusalem. He worked at The Boston Globe for a dozen years, four of them as its legal and Supreme Court correspondent.

He is the author of “Battle for Justice: How the Bork Nomination Shook America,” which was named one of the best 25 books of 1989 by The New York Public Library and awarded a Silver Gavel by the American Bar Association. Mr. Bronner is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a former trustee of Wesleyan University.



CONTENT BY THIS PERSON

News Story

A Call for Drastic Changes in Educating New Lawyers

Ethan Bronner
New York Times (NYT)
February 10, 2013
The legal profession is contemplating radical changes to legal educational amid broad agreement that the current system is broken.

News Story

Right to Lawyer Can Be Empty Promise for Poor

Ethan Bronner
New York Times (NYT)
March 13, 2013
SCHR has filed a class-action suit seeking a guarantee of a lawyer in civil cases in Georgia where someone faces a loss of liberty.

News Story

No Lawyer for Miles, So One Rural State Offers Pay

Ethan Bronner
New York Times (NYT)
April 8, 2013
A new South Dakota law subsidizes to live and work in rural areas. It's getting interest from other rural states where lawyers are scarce.



This page last modified: Wed, April 22, 2015 -- 7:27 am ET